Mr Percy Parsnip and his Parsnip Pup

Mr Percy Parsnip and his parsnip pup.

Mr Percy Parsnip and his parsnip pup.

To a palate un-jaded by refined sugar, a parsnip, simply roasted, can be as honeyed as a lollipop, and that is how it was often used in the past – in sweet dishes, fritters and cakes but this native root really is born to be the constant companion of roast beef and is an essential part of ‘all the trimmings’. The parsnip caramelises with salty savour in a way the usurping potato can never hope to achieve.  I think they’re so good I often make parsnips chips as a savoury appetiser before supper. They all go, and pretty darn quick.

Parsnip chips

Salt is essential to parsnips so don’t skimp.  They must be salty enough to counterbalance the caramelised sweetness of the root and thin enough to be crisp. Once cooked, I like to sprinkle them with thyme but it depends on my mood, other complimentary sprinklings that I find good are cumin, nutmeg, garam masala, crushed bay leaves or paprika, all of which go down go down a treat. Add some prosciutto dressed with a squeeze of lemon on the side and you have a starter.

Directions: Peel 6 parsnips and boil them for a few minutes so they soften but remain firm. When done, slice the parsnips lengthways into 8 pieces each so they resemble chips. Dry them in a cloth and then shake them up with some flour, seasoned with plenty of salt and pepper. This will give them a crisp coating. Meanwhile heat a large pan (so they lay separately) to smoking with sunflower oil, if you don’t have a big enough pan cook them in batches. Fry them until golden which takes about 5-10 minutes, turning them occasionally with a pair of tongs. Sprinkle with fresh thyme, taste and add more salt if needed. Serve hot.

Other tasty ways with parsnips

Parsnip and shallot tart tatin with ready roll puff pastry

Mashed parsnip cakes coated with egg and Panko crumbs

Parsnip, puy lentil and watercress salad

Curried parsnip and apple soup

Parsnip and parmesan soufflé

The Devonshire Dairy and tales of Ice Cream.

The Devonshire Dairy Ice cream

Parmesan ice cream is extremely rich, creamy and very naughty, I love it, but the savoury flavour is not to everyone’s taste. Serve the ice cream in this recipe at the end of a meal with slices of hard, green pear or drop a scoop into gazpacho and add a sprinkle of chopped green chilli.

The 18th century recipe works but be careful not to over-heat the cream or you’ll end up with scrambled eggs! More modern recipes separate the egg yolks into the mix first and then fold in beaten egg white at the end.

Lucy is at The Devonshire Dairy, 36 The Square, Chagford,Devon  TQ13 8AH she is always welcoming.  www.thedevonshiredairy.co.uk  The dairy maybe closed in the depths of winter so check the website for opening times.


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